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Entries for month: November 2012

Recent OfficeFinder Tweets - We try to be relevant

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I have not posted my tweets here in a long time. You can see what I have been following. Hope you will follow me.

OfficeFinder Sweet Tweets - Click to follow us

 The cubicle's days are numbered... of course they have been saying that for years. Maybe now it is true! http://pinterest.com/pin/2674081000436183/ …

OfficeFinder #OfficeSpace News is out! http://paper.li/OfficeFinder/1318021671 … This is our daily newspaper that gets Tweeted.

CBRE Group: Office Market Vacancies Will Decline to 14.9% In 2013 and to 13.8% in 2014 http://ow.ly/fAuif 

Demand for 'creative office' space isn't going away http://ow.ly/fAtXN 

Jack Taylor scores 138 points for Grinnell - Yahoo! Sports http://ow.ly/ftP9O 

How To NOT Look for a New Office - steps you should definitely NOT take http://ow.ly/frRt1 

The Economy and the Great Office Space Reboot http://ow.ly/frupk 

Update Office Furniture to Fit your Style Needs http://ow.ly/fgHUL 

Hurricane Sandy Shows It’s Time to Embrace Workplace Flexibility http://ow.ly/flTzx 

#Coworking Spaces: What You Can Expect http://ow.ly/femGr 

5 Jaw-dropping Corporate Campuses http://ow.ly/femtI 

Program Your Office To The Changing Workplace http://ow.ly/fgHST 

Amazing Startup Offices are the New Normal | #officespacehttp://ow.ly/fem97

Do You really Have The time? | Tenant Tactics #officespacehttp://ow.ly/fgGnC 

Office Myth: All Office Coffee is Terrible. http://ow.ly/fgHOL 

The Rise of the New Contract Worker - More and more people are choosing a contingent work style Harvard Business Review http://ow.ly/fhPP7 

CoWhat? Workspace Design Models, Part 2 Will contractors will become more important than full-time employees? ”http://ow.ly/fhPwq 

6 Tips for Negotiating a Commercial Property Lease without Getting Burned | http://SBA.gov  http://ow.ly/fehso 

9 Office Leasing Tips Every Businessperson Should Know - http://ow.ly/fehGM 

4 Questions To Ponder When Branding Your Workplace http://ow.ly/felWp 

How to Structure a More Flexible Office Lease http://ow.ly/fewbZ 

33% of Lower Manhattan office space uninhabitable http://ow.ly/fcaeI 

http://lnkd.in/MnZFb4  So many business are missing the low hanging fruit from the traffic they are already getting and instead focusing...

Office space without limits - no matter how flexible, does not cut it http://ow.ly/fajGn 

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By: James Osgood

Office Space , Office Rental , Manhattan Office Space , Office Leasing Tips , Coworking office space , Office Space Negotiations , Flexible Workspace

Successful Negotiation Tactics for Your Office Space Lease: part 2

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When you lease commercial office space, the process included negotiating with the property owner to establish what will be contained in your lease.  Having a basic knowledge of the pitfalls to avoid and the opportunities to save money will make the task much less arduous for you.

While landlords are reticent to lower rental rates, stating that the property is valued high and has a high level of prestige and lender requirements must be met, there are other costs embedded in the lease that are open for negotiations. Include a well-qualified tenant representative in all phases of negotiations. In fact, the tenant rep may be the person who located the perfect property for you.

Once you’ve worked your way through the office space location process and located the office space that best fits our needs, your tenant rep will send the landlord a letter of intent. This is a non-binding statement that tells the landlord what space you want to rent and how much you want to pay. While other elements are included in this letter, they are all open to negotiation.  This letter may end up being revised several times after going back and forth with the landlord to reach an acceptable agreement.

Office Lease Term: The length of time you wish to lease the office space can be anywhere from one year to a decade or more. The basic lease probably states a specific office lease term, perhaps five years, but you can required that period be changed to suit your needs. If you are planning to do a lot of improvement to the property, you may want a long lease, whereas if you are a growing company, you may want a much shorter lease to allow you to readily move into larger office spaces if needed in a few years. Be sure the terms regarding lease renewal are also clearly stated.

Beginning Lease Date: Sometimes commercial office space requires major construction or tenant improvements before you move in and begin doing business from that location. Be sure that you don’t have to begin paying rent until you occupy the space.

Rental Incentives: Some commercial office spaces offer rental incentives such as one or more months rent free upon signing a lease of a specific duration. Even if no rental incentives are advertised in the office space listing, you may be able to negotiate some incentive by simply asking the landlord. If the building is completely occupied except the space you are considering leasing, then it is less likely that the landlord will give this concession, but if the building needs occupants, the landlord may be very flexible about offering incentives to establish you business in that location.

Offie Space Tenant Improvements: Another concession sometimes offered by a landlord to new tenants is an allowance to make changes to the office space layout. Your tenant rep will be a big help in negotiating changes to the office space. Perhaps you want interior upgrades, parking lot improvements, or other changes, you want to include these requests in your letter of intent and discuss them at length with the landlord. You may find that the landlord will pay for all improvements in order to get a long term lease established. The landlord might give you an allowance and ask that you bear part of the expense; this makes negotiating this area particularly sensitive because you want to get the improvements at little or no cost to you. If there are no improvements needed, use this fact to help negotiate a period of free rent instead.

Exclusivity Clause: Some types of businesses find it important to avoid having a competing business in the same area as their operation. You may negotiate with the landlord to guarantee that a business of the same type as yours will not be allowed to rent in the same building. If the landlord owns a large area of building near your office, you may even be able to establish that no competing business will be allowed to rent from the landlord in a specific radius. This often applies to businesses that sell specific services or provide retail products.

These are just a few ideas on areas in which negotiations are possible, but there can be a wide range that vary from market to market. Obtaining the services of a qualified Tenant Represenative, as OfficeFinder Members are, will ensure that you can take advantage of all possible negotiation opportunities. Remember, Tenant reps do this every day, while you do it a the most every few years. There is no cost to you to have one represent you. It is already built into the cost of the space whether you take advantage of it or not. Use our short form to request assistance to find a qualified tenant rep you can work with.

By: James Osgood

Office Rental , Tenant Representation , Office Leasing Tips , Office Space Negotiations , Office Relocation

The Future of the Office Building

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Gensler has presented their study of the future of the office building via video. Fascinating! As our workforce becomes more mobile, the office building will need to evolve and move away from housing employees to a function of servicing them. The future may be here before we know it!

Click here to view video

 

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Office Space , Flexible Workspace

Successful Negotiation Tactics for Your Office Space Lease: Part 1

When you lease commercial office space, the process included negotiating with the property owner to establish what will be contained in your lease.  Having a basic knowledge of the pitfalls to avoid and the opportunities to save money will make the task much less arduous for you and your tenant representative.

While landlords are reticent to lower rental rates, stating that the property is valued high and has a high level of prestige, there are other costs embedded in the lease that are open for negotiations. Include a well-qualified tenant representative in all phases of negotiations. In fact, the tenant rep may be the person who located the perfect property for you.

Once you’ve located the perfect office space, the tenant rep will send the landlord a letter of intent. This is a non-binding statement that tells the landlord what space you want to rent and how much you want to pay. While other elements are included in this letter, they are all open to negotiation.  This letter may end up being revised several times after going back and forth with the landlord to reach an acceptable agreement.

Lease Term: The length of time you wish to lease the office space can be anywhere from one year to a decade or more. The basic lease probably states a specific lease term, perhaps five years, but you can required that period be changed to suit your needs. If you are planning to do a lot of improvement to the property, you may want a long lease, whereas if you are a growing company, you may want a much shorter lease to allow you to readily move into larger office spaces if needed in a few years. Be sure the terms regarding lease renewal are also clearly stated.

Beginning Lease Date: Sometimes commercial office space requires major construction or tenant improvements before you move in and begin doing business from that location. Be sure that you don’t have to begin paying rent until you occupy the space.

Percentage Rent: Some leases contain a clause regarding percentage rent, meaning that once a business opens and their sales reach a specified point, a percentage of the gross sales go to the landlord, increasing the overall cost of rental. Depending on the type of business you operate, you may wish to ask your tenant rep to help you negotiate this clause out of the lease or at least make sure that you will have met the specified goal for 12 months before paying any percentage charge. This clause is more likely to impact retail businesses and service or manufacturing operations.

Rental Incentives: Some commercial office spaces offer rental incentives such as one or more months rent free upon signing a lease of a specific duration. Even if no rental incentives are advertised in the office space listing, you may be able to negotiate some incentive by simply asking the landlord. If the building is completely occupied except the space you are considering leasing, then it is less likely that the landlord will give this concession, but if the building needs occupants, the landlord may be very flexible about offering incentives to establish you business in that location.

Tenant Improvements: Another concession sometimes offered by a landlord to new tents is an allowance to make changes to the office space layout. Your tenant rep will be a big help in negotiating changes to the office space. Perhaps you want interior upgrades, parking lot improvements, or other changes, you want to include these requests in your letter of intent and discuss them at length with the landlord. You may find that the landlord will pay for all improvements in order to get a long term lease established. The landlord might give you an allowance and ask that you bear part of the expense; this makes negotiating this area particularly sensitive because you want to get the improvements at little or no cost to you. If there are no improvements needed, use this fact to help negotiate a period of free rent instead.

Exclusivity Clause: Some types of businesses find it important to avoid having a competing business in the same area as their operation. You may negotiate with the landlord to guarantee that a business of the same type as yours will not be allowed to rent in the same building. If the landlord owns a large area of building near your office, you may even be able to establish that no competing business will be allowed to rent from the landlord in a specific radius. This often applies to businesses that sell specific services or provide retail products.

 Find Office Space

By: James Osgood

Office Rental , Lease Negotiations , Office Space Negotiations

How We Help You Make the Right Decision to Get Our Assistance

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I was interviewed a couple of months ago about how we get our visitors to request assistance. Here is the result on MSN Business on Main:

"Getting traffic to your site is just the first hurdle. Optimizing your site so that visitors actually click — and keep on clicking until they become customers — is both an art and a science.

In 2011, entrepreneur Jim Osgood noticed that leads from his website were down about 30 percent for no apparent reason. After determining that the falloff had occurred around the same time that Google had made some changes to its search engine, Osgood, owner of OfficeFinder, a website that generates leads for commercial real estate agents, decided it was time to zero in on improving conversions. After contracting with conversion rate optimization firm Click Advisors, Osgood uncovered other issues beyond Google.

“There were glaring problems with my site,” he says. Those issues included too much text, as well as forms that were hard to find. After several months of work with Click Advisors, which focused on A/B testing of different landing pages and focus groups, the OfficeFinder site doubled its conversions from Google pay-per-click campaigns from 6 percent to 12 percent while reducing the cost per lead by 50 percent..."

Read the entire article