Category Archives: Employee engagement

Creating A Great Workplace For A Multigenerational Workforce

Helpful tips for a great workplaceToday’s office workplace is rapidly changing. Work is becoming more of what we do and less of where we are. What can you do to create a great workplace for your company? Here are several ideas that can help you.

First off, one of the tools being used in this change is that of office hoteling. It is where those who do not need a full time desk space simply login and reserve a space when needed, resulting in savings of up to 40% in real office space costs.

As the office space workplace goes more and more mobile, with employees working wherever is convenient, it becomes necessary to recruit and retain the most motivated employees. If workers are not self-motivated, the system can easily be abused. Today’s younger workforce, however, is used to and prefers the idea of being mobile. When pay is tied to performance, they can and will perform for your business and be happier while do it. They are also more focused on the work-life balance where this type of Officing strategy fits in well.

Once great part of the changing workplace is that, depending on the type of business you operate, hours can be flexible to accommodate the life-work balance necessary to keep the best employees happy. Many areas of business, for example office space, often lend themselves to hours outside the traditional 9-5 pattern. The flexible worker can maintain balance by planning errands such as auto service or simply relaxing over a long breakfast by simply notifying their employer that their day will have altered hours. That two hours spent in the evening doing revenue-generating work can be taken off during the day instead of being considered overtime.

Employees today move from job to job rapidly, each time moving up in salary and position. In order to keep the very best on your staff, you must be flexible with them as well as expecting them to be flexible with your needs. The increased work-life balance priority is related to shifts in workplace priorities since many workers will spend as much as 95% of their time away from the traditional office space.

Values sought by today’s worker in terms of work-life balance include respect and trust from the employer. Family concerns being respected by the boss is critical. They want some hours they can telework from home when needed or when desired and more control over their work schedule. Unless a company is willing to institute flexible work policies and programs, the brightest and best will move on to a company that better understands their wants and needs.

Assess what flexibility makes sense for your organization. Would an office hoteling reservation system allow you to reduce real estate footprint and help workers feel more empowered? Would accommodating telework from home when a child is sick or another emergency fit into your business? What other flexible options could you institute to keep your best employees happy and offer them a balance between family and life needs and employment requirements?

A properly planned office hoteling reservation system can save money and increase productivity. Contact us so we can get you started finding out how Office Hoteling might work for your company.

How Work Space Evolution Enhances Employee Performance

No matter what market your business serves, you know that profits are earned because of good, talented, employees working hard. Without these valued employees you would not have a thriving enterprise. And the better the team members perform the more your business will thrive.

So much of business performance today is knowledge-based work. People who have that knowledge and creativity are sought after by many companies and today’s workforce feel comfortable changing jobs several times in their career. This is so unlike our parents and grandparents where a person secured a job and stuck with that employer until they earned the gold watch at retirement.

Clearly, this means that those companies that are able to keep the talented knowledge employees happy will retain the talent longer than companies where employees do not feel valued, love their work and their work environments. When an organization can evolve to provide their team with practical options regarding where and sometimes even when work is performed, employees can choose work styles that best fit their personal needs.

One employee may work best in complete silence with no hustle and bustle around. That person may prefer to work from home, if the home office is quiet, several days per week and especially when performing more tedious tasks, coming into the office only as needed. This type of employee must be a self-starter who works well with little direction.

Another employee may thrive on the networking and sense of competition that the traditional office provides and prefer to come to the main office most days. These tend to be people who require a little more direction. While this employee will likely readily accept and implement technological advancements, they may be a bit hesitant when first making changes in processes to improve them.

Yet another type of employee may work best while on the move, working in third spaces such as cafes and internet hotspots while between meetings with clients. This type of working tends to be a real self-starter who has a strong dislike for the hassles of involved with reporting to a traditional office just for the sake of being seen. It is likely that this person will fully utilize each new technological development that makes their work faster and easier and embrace positive changes. This work style may involve some days spent at the office, some days where a few necessary minutes are spent at the office, and other days where all the day is spent working with clients or spots near the next client’s office.

An employer who can accommodate each of these types of employee will find it easier to retain talent and a high degree of production. When employees find they can work in whatever style suits them best for each specific goal or task, they are happier and feel empowered. Happy, empowered employees product more and stay with your company longer.

Six Factors That Can Help Turn Your Office Space Into a Great Workplace

Everyone wants a workplace that is wonderful but why is one workplace great while another is lacking? Is it the leased office space that makes a particular firm productive and profitable? Could it be the specific office furniture or location? None of these things alone make any workplace truly great.

A great workplace is not about the brand of computers, the prestige of the building’s address. Here are six factors that can work together to allow business owners to create an organization that excites employees, resulting in the reputation of being a great workplace.

  1. Replace Policies with Company Mission: Hiring, motivating and retaining top notch employees if not about policies; those are simply rules. Create a company mission and vision that the team believes in and supports. With passion for a mission based on the CEO’s vision, rather than a bunch of policy statements, cultivates a real team capable of leaping forward with ideas and innovations as well as loyalty and hard work.
  2. Nurture Collaboration: Never stifle team members’ desires to work together, carrying ideas from one area of the business into others. Create a workplace where each group or department is allowed to freely convey ideas to other organizational groups. The pay-off in productivity, amazing leaps forward and trained staff retention is incredible.
  3. Cultivate Agile Workspaces: Today’s office space is not the traditional cubicle or corner office. An office hoteling software application allows easy utilization of much smaller workspaces and allows each member of an organization to work in the style that is best for them. Technology allows the telecommuting or third place team members to only be physically in-office as needed. Work areas that provide desks or standing work counters allow team members to avoid the strain of sitting at a computer immobile for hours at a time. Staying in close contact does not have to mean being in the same conference room any longer. The office space of today is any area where business can conveniently and productively be conducted.
  4. Replace Ownership with Membership: Everyone employee is accountable to their customers and managers but in the past processes were “owned” by an employee, generating office stress and politics as power plays were often used to try to win the ownership role. Instead, remove the territorial nature of office spaces and encourage the concept of being privileged to be a member of a team or teams that create revenue and find ways for the company to save money. It becomes everyone’s process and fosters a sense of belonging and identity in the work environment.
  5. Create a Quality Experience for Employees: It is little surprise that employee retention is low in those workspaces that are dull and uninspiring. Create an office space that team members what to enter into and do work. Strive for a vibrant, magnetic space that draws people in during their in-office work time. This engages employees and they will look forward to the connected, exhilarated feeling obtained when they need to hotel an office space for an hour or a day.
  6. Stay on the Cutting Edge: Today’s fast paced, constantly changing economy allows those companies built on flexible office spaces with strong company values and loyalty to survive when others around them fall. As work methods, technological capabilities and mobile computing power speed along, use best practices to stay on the cutting edge. Remember that it’s the people who create value in a knowledge based company; an office is just a space that houses technology where people can come perform productive tasks.

These are some of the keys that can turn your office space into a great workplace for your employees, making them happier and more productive at the same time.

Four Generation Workplaces:
Why Different Management Styles are Necessary

For the first time in history, managers are faced with the requirements to effectively manage four different generations in the workplace. The future will likely continue to contain four generations even as those generations move along the timeline of life and business.

What Generations are Working Today?

According to the Age and Sex Composition, the generational breakdown of employees and managers today fall into these categories:

  1. Veterans born prior to 1946: This group makes up 2 percent of the workforce at the time of the census data collection and reporting in 2017.
  2. Baby Boomers born in the post-World War II years: This group is defined in the reports as those being born between 1946 and 1964 and make up 25  percent of the workforce.
  3. Generation X members, aka Gen Xers: are considered to be the segment born between 1965 and 1980 and make up 33 percent of the total workforce today and
  4. Millennial or Generation Y is the workforce members born after 1981 through present and total 40 percent of the total.

As time passes and the older generation disappear an additional, a younger generation will come of age so business will find it necessary to remain in touch with the remaining worker generations and develop ways to effectively work with the newer generations. Each generation has its own work style and lifestyle.  Managers need to understand what they need to do to encourage employee productivity. In the future and right now it is critical to learn to deal with the workers currently in the business world. This is crucial to producing profit and growth in any form of business.

Managing The High Maintenance Generation Y (Millennials)

The youngest group of employees in the workplace today is comprised of those born after 1981 and generally considered to be from before 2005s. This group is known as Generation Y or Millennials and they make up 40  percent of the total workforce according to Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. The American Society of Training and Development reported that during the next 20 years, 76 million workers will retire while only 46 million workers will enter the workforce to replace them. Most of these 46 million workers will be Millennial generation workers. Just as the three older generations in today’s workforce, Gen Y workers have unique desires and needs that they expect from their manager and the business for which they work.

Generation Y employees will be crucial to business enterprises. They will certainly change the way business is conducted in many ways. But, in currently and in the immediate future these employees offer great challenges to management to ensure these workers integrate with the existing workforce with as little conflict as possible.

Among the positive traits brought to the workforce, one of the major benefits that Millennials bring t the workplace is their high degree of technological skills. These employees were practically born with a computer in front of them and are intrigues by each and every development in the work of Information Technology.

Millennials grew up with digital global communication capability at their fingertips. Information of all kinds is expected to be immediatly available on demand. They understand using virtual teams to solve problems and are extremely team oriented.

Millennials view the business work as a global workplace, viewing the entire world as potential sources of information, clients, and community. Millennials seek fast-track career positions, frequent positive feedback, the latest technology and challenging training opportunities. Their outspokenness brings them to challenge long outdated work policies and conventions, offering businesses to perform a check on the hypocrisies and shortcomings of today’s workplace. Ultimately, Gen Yers may well drive change for the better.

Much has been said and published about the negative points of Millennials. They tend to have a sense of entitlement and are outspoken. This group of workers does not take constructive criticism well and require more direction and feedback from superiors than previous generations. Fortune magazine stated in its May 28, 2007 edition that this group are “the most high-maintenance, yet potentially most high-performing generation in history because its members are entering the workplace with more information, greater technological skill and higher expectations of themselves and others than prior generations.”  Additionally, Time’s July 16, 2007 edition stated that members of Generation Y want the kind of life balance where every minute has meaning; they don’t want to be slaves to their jobs as they feel their Baby Boomer parents were and often still are. Millennials also want employers to be socially responsible causes and allow for volunteer commitments through the use of flex-time or compensation time. Flexibility in work hours is important to this group of workers.

Yes, this generation requires a great deal of management, but it is well worth the effort to recruit them into your business They are smart and have the drive and creative thinking to make a real different in the business world and in a company’s profitability.

It is clear that recruiting Generation Y members and adjusting to their wants and needs will prepare industry for the entry of the next generation, people that are expected to be even more technology oriented. While this generation does not even yet have a “name”, it won’t be long before they begin entering the workforce and seeking employment in your company.

By understanding the four major groups into today’s workforce and providing for each group’s needs, effective employees can find their jobs satisfying and are more likely to remain with your business. Each group brings many positive aspects, all of which can be used effectively to gain greater efficiency and streamline operations to ensure profitability.

Managing the Baby Boomer Generation

Baby Boomers are those born in the post World War II years, from 1946 through 1964. This group makes up 25 percent of the current workforce per the Age and Sex Composition. These workers bring unique work styles into the work environment and require different management styles on the part of superiors. Currently they hold the majority of leadership positions in the workplace.

Like the veterans born before 1946, this group did not group up with technology as part of their childhood. Even during most of their higher education, computers were huge things that read punched cards or difficult to program units that could do less than our phones do today. Baby Boomers are, however, excited by technology and find adapting easier than the older generation. Most Boomers reach out for training to incorporate the newest techniques into their skills.

Baby Boomers value respect for their long service, skills, knowledge and managers will find recognition for Boomer’s wisdom is a key to successful integration of these workers and managers into the profitable organization. Managers of Boomers should honor the history and memories brought into the work environment because past experiences can bring understanding to current situations, providing positive outcomes. When policies are placed in a historical perspective, employees can often understand and accept more easily.

Baby Boomers find recognition extremely important. Whether recognized personally or publically, motivate Boomers through recognizing their accomplishment and clearly expecting superior outcomes from their efforts will help ensure happy Boomers. Embrace their best ideas and implement those into processes and methods.

Boomers tend to have conflict between their desire to compete on an individual basis and their desire to be part of a team. Encourage these workers to focus on the team in the short-term as an effective means to bring personal recognition and success for themselves in the long term.

Boomers also find conflict with the generation born before 1946 because the older generation tends to feel entitlement to perks on the job. Boomers often have the false feeling that those employees have not paid the dues they have to gain their positions. They also tend to find conflict with the younger generations coming into the workplace with high levels of technical expertise and feel they are unfairly competing with this generation that they view as “coddled”. By placing Boomers in mentoring positions, managers can often mitigate these negative feelings and generate feelings of teamwork and workplace “families”.

Managing the Veteran Generation

There are two groups in the workforce today who were born before 1946. Veterans of the Second World War make up about 2% of the employees, including managers, comprising the current workforce. This workforce group, sometimes called the Silent Generation, Greatest Generation, or Paper Agers, requires special management considerations.

The workers in this group were largely not exposed to technology and computers until these methods became a necessary part of the employment. Often they feel that due to their impending retirement they should not be required to move into the computer age. Because the work methods used early in their career were low-tech yet workable, they want to continue to use printed paper trails and other more familiar methods that they are comfortable with. Yet, the work environment has moved into high-tech and these workers are forced to adapt. Technology is the major hurdle for the generation of workers born prior to 1946. This can cause conflict between the Silent Generation and those born into the age where technology was part of their lives from childhood onward.

Paper Agers often feel that any information not presented in hard copy has little meaning. They find it difficult to conform to the paperless workplace. Their strong work ethics and “get it done” attitudes can add strength to teams and tasks assigned to be worked alone. This group of workers has no room for failure and drive toward success. They strive to please superiors in all their efforts and they do fine ways to adjust to technology when presented with training opportunities.

Often, veterans born prior 1946 find themselves in management positions because they are long-term employees and tend to be upwardly mobile in the organization chart. Their structured backgrounds lead them to have strong respect for hierarchy.  They build strong relationships based on loyalty, structure and time. They work well in management positions because they have been long exposed to experiences where information was provided on a “need to know” basis. This makes them able to keep information to themselves where necessary and provide information to the right parties when necessary. Their frugal natures make them capable of adhering to both budget and schedule.

It can be very difficult at times for younger managers to relate to the workers from this era. Frustration arises when the high-tech manager has to deal with their lack of native technical expertise, but they can excel in technical positions when provided necessary training. The younger manager may have grown up with high-tech and resents the cost and time required to train these workers in technology. Yet, the long-term work experience and lessons learned gained from these workers can lead to creative ideas that generate greater profit for the organization. Therefore, younger managers should be trained to value these workers and utilize their skills while providing growth opportunities through technical training.

Final Words

As you can see, there are many factors involved in creating a great workplace. Hopefully we have given you some ideas you can work with to enhance your business.

If you are looking for the right office space to create your great workplace, we’d love to help. It is what we do on a daily basis through out the US and Canada. Give us a try. No cost and no obligation. Let us know what you are looking for and we will get right on it.

Do You Have a Great Workplace for Employees?

How good is your workplace?Everyone wants a workplace that is wonderful but why is one workplace great while another is lacking? Is it the leased office space that makes a particular firm productive and profitable? Could it be the specific office furniture or location? None of these things alone make any workplace truly great.

A great workplace is not about the brand of computers, the prestige of the building’s address. Here are six attributes that can work together to allow business owners to create an organization that excites employees, resulting in the reputation of being a great workplace.

6 Attributes of a Great Workplace

  1. Replace Policies with Company Mission: Hiring, motivating and retaining top notch employees if not about policies; those are simply rules. Create a company mission and vision that the team believes in and supports. With passion for a mission based on the CEO’s vision, rather than a bunch of policy statements, cultivates a real team capable of leaping forward with ideas and innovations as well as loyalty and hard work.
  2. Nurture Collaboration: Never stifle team members’ desires to work together, carrying ideas from one area of the business into others. Create a workplace where each group or department is allowed to freely convey ideas to other organizational groups. The pay-off in productivity, amazing leaps forward and trained staff retention is incredible.
  3. Cultivate an Agile Workplace: Today’s office space is not the traditional cubicle or corner office. An office hoteling software application allows easy utilization of much smaller workspaces and allows each member of an organization to work in the style that is best for them. Technology allows the telecommuting or third place team members to only be physically in-office as needed. Work areas that provide desks or standing work counters allow team members to avoid the strain of sitting at a computer immobile for hours at a time. Staying in close contact does not have to mean being in the same conference room any longer. The office space of today is any area where business can conveniently and productively be conducted.
  4. Replace Ownership with Membership: Everyone employee is accountable to their customers and managers but in the past processes were “owned” by an employee, generating office stress and politics as power plays were often used to try to win the ownership role. Instead, remove the territorial nature of office spaces and encourage the concept of being privileged to be a member of a team or teams that create revenue and find ways for the company to save money. It becomes everyone’s process and fosters a sense of belonging and identity in the work environment.
  5. Create a Quality Experience for Employees: It is little surprise that employee retention is low in those workplaces that are dull and uninspiring. Create an office space that team members what to enter into and do work. Strive for a vibrant, magnetic space that draws people in during their in-office work time. This engages employees and they will look forward to the connected, exhilarated feeling obtained when they need to hotel an office space for an hour or a day.
  6. Stay on the Cutting Edge: Today’s fast paced, constantly changing economy allows those companies built on flexible office spaces with strong company values and loyalty to survive,  while others around them fail. As work methods, technological capabilities and mobile computing power speed along, use best practices to stay on the cutting edge. Remember that it’s the people who create value in a knowledge based company; an office is just a space that houses technology where people can come perform productive tasks. .

These are some of the attributes that will help turn your office space into a great workplace for your employees; making them both happier and more productive at the same time.

Furthermore, INC.com reviewed the best in office amenities and policies that were covered in Inc. and on Inc.com.

Here are 10 Tips for Making Employees Love Their Workplace:

  1.        Stay Organized
  2.        Make it Comfortable
  3.        Give Everyone a Say
  4.        Consider Openness
  5.        Make the Workplace a Community
  6.        Focus on Utility
  7.        Make the Office Optional
  8.        Make Education a Priority
  9.        Consider Mixing Uses in a Great Space
  10.        Add Some Perks

Some interesting opinions that we found in Workplace Experience Group on LinkedIn.

One of the keys to a productive workforce is happy employees and a positive workplace not only helps productivity, but also reduces the number of employees leaving.

“Organizations of all types, large and small, for-profit and not-for-profit, from across the U.S. and Canada, are implementing programs and policies that foster employee health and well-being while enhancing organizational performance.”

http://www.phwa.org/ – American Psychological Association – Psychologically Healthy Workplaces

“We have been listening to employees and evaluating employers since 1980 in order to understand what makes a workplace great. We know that the foundation of every great workplace is trust between employees and management. Our employee survey, culture assessment tools, research, and advisory services have made us leaders in helping organizations build high-trust workplaces. “

http://www.greatplacetowork.com/ – Great Place To Work Institute

If you need help finding a great workplace for your business, we’d be happy to help. Let us know what you are looking for and we will get right to work. There is no cost to you for our services. It is FREE.

Coworking Perks People Love: Workplace Strategies to Improve Productivity

coworkingOne of the best things about having office space in a coworking environment is that it offers employees a chance to socialize and meet people beyond their own workplace. Happier employees are excited to come to work. Here are a few tips to keep your employees happy and help increase their productivity in at work.

Encourage Participation in Workplace Learning Activities.

Coworking spaces offer tenants opportunities like lunch and learns and happy hour discussions. These are “free” sessions for your employees to attend and broaden their knowledge of a particular subject. In some cases, these opportunities could help them do their own work and make them a more productive member of the team.

Participate in Workplace Social Activities.

If your coworking space does not already offer its tenants a chance to join a team like kickball or have regular ping pong tournaments, see if you can work with the managers to organize one. Exercise is a great mood lifter and helps the brain with memory and learning.

Suggest Working in Common Areas.

As human beings, we crave social interaction. Coworking spaces offer employees the chance to meet new people in the common areas or engage in discussions that aren’t related to work. Offering your employees a moment to step outside their everyday work routine provides time to recharge their batteries.

All of these strategies are inherent perks when you lease in a coworking environment. Look for these types of amenities when you look for new office space and your employees will appreciate it. Contact us for more information on how we can help find the right workplace for you and your company.

Boosting Workplace Inclusion with Human-Centric Design Strategies

Workplace Inclusion StrategiesUnlike many traditional office strategies, “human-centric” Workplace Inclusion Principles prioritize the unique needs of employees and offer empathetic ways to meet them.

Although human-centric office strategies often clash with archaic assumptions that the “management is always right,” human-centric principles provide innovative ways to unify entire work forces and foster inclusive atmospheres where every employee feels valued. Human-centric strategies actively combat pressing workplace issues such as:

  • Low employee retention rates
  • Declining workplace moral
  • Bullying and interpersonal conflicts
  • Lack of employee growth and promotion

Creating a human-centric office atmosphere is easier than many think.  By implementing key steps, we can quickly transform our office climate for the better.

Look for Common Issues

If one employee is struggling with a particular issue, at least several others are as well.  By actively observing employees and departments for similar employee challenges, we can identify worrisome patterns before they grow. Employee health, personality conflicts, and uncomfortable work spaces are among the most common office challenges. Gather information and discuss recurring issues with Human Resources.  The first step to resolving office issues is to quickly and thoroughly identify them. Above all, we must always share our concerns with our employees and colleagues; regularly ask for their input and opinion regarding what challenges they face each day at work.

Invite Brainstorming Sessions and Collaboration

After gathering information and outlining your office’s most pressing issues, invite your work force to “brainstorming sessions.” Host small-scale ones for each department or invite your employees in small, designated groups to ensure organization and minimize the possibility of drama or bullying.  Encourage everyone to take part in these sessions and set clear discussion parameters.  Discuss the issue thoroughly and welcome possible solutions from each attendee.  Although not every potential solution will be used, these problem-solving hubs ensure that employees feels their opinions and needs are valued.  Even after immediate issues are solved, continue the principle of these employee “town halls.” Regularly scheduled meetings keep everyone abreast of developing issues and ensure no one is neglected.

Invest in “Human-Friendly” Office Designs and Renovation

In addition to office communication and group problem-solving, take a close look at office lay-out and catalog the pros and cons associated with the furniture, aesthetic, and equipment.  What environment do  your employees work in?  Do they feel comfortable in their work space?  What office renovations would encourage greater productivity?  Does my office compromise work place health or employee morale in any way?  By asking these important questions, we can accurately judge how beneficial our office choices are for our staff.

If looking to make necessary improvements, always invest in ergonomic solutions that prioritize employee health and comfort.  Also, consider transforming your office lay-out with modern, “human-friendly” solutions such as communal office space, indoor greenery, movable walls, and natural lighting. By regularly updating office design to meet employee needs, we keep our work space atmosphere fresh and healthy for the future.

Although not every office implements human-centric principles, more and more corporate leaders are recognizing the benefits of this revolutionary office strategy. By proactively creating a more “employee-friendly” work atmosphere, businesses are inadvertently boosting their company’s productivity, moral, and long-range goals.

If you need office space to implement Workplace Inclusion Strategies, contact us today.

Millennials in the Workplace: How the New Majority of Workers Will Change Your Culture

Millennials in the workplace

Millennials in the Workplace means your office culture is about to change – dramatically. Today’s companies must prepare their office cultures for this influx of young workers. But how?

At one time, the baby boomer generation (born 1940s to 1960s) dominated the workplace, creating a culture of workers who stayed at the same company for decades. They worked hard, asked for little and sacrificed a lot to climb the ladder.

That was then. But this is now: The millennials or generation Y (born 1980s to 2000s) now represent a majority of the American workforce.

What Millennials in the Workplace Want

A new Gallup report reveals that most workers, many of whom are millennials, want their work to have meaning and purpose. This is especially true for gen Y. Despite their student loan debt, millennials are motivated by meaning as much as they are by money.

This means that to attract and retain millennials, it will become increasingly important for companies to show they care through community involvement and sponsorship of charitable causes.

Be a Company That Cares

Involve employees in charitable causes and ask them to volunteer for outreach programs. Partner with a cause that reflects your corporate values and let employees make charitable contributions through payroll deductions.

You can also find local opportunities for community service such as soup kitchens. Consider offering Volunteer Time Off (VTO) to employees who volunteer during work hours. Even if you only allow several hours a month, millennials will respond enthusiastically, engendering loyalty.

As you hire more millennials, you will find that their fresh perspective elevates the conversation inside your office culture, causing older workers and managers to rethink their own sense of meaning.

If you would like to find office space that can prepare your company for the new wave of Millennials in the Workplace, or if you have thoughts to share, contact us. We would love to hear from you.

Rethinking Preconceived Notions About Millennials in the Workplace

Millennials in the workplace

The Reality of Generational Issues in the Workplace

The issues associated with Millennials in the workplace can no longer be ignored. It’s true that Millennials now dominate the workforce. However, in an era where Baby Boomers are very reluctant to retire and where the neglected members of Generation X are still well within their prime years of employment, generational conflict is something that all employers have to consider. Employers will be more effective at resolving these issues if they are able to confront existing stereotypes about Millennials in particular.

Millennials in the Workplace and Career Advancement

It’s widely believed that Millennials are largely uninterested in putting in the time and effort that it takes to excel in a career. Some people attribute this to the idea that Millennials prioritize their family members over their jobs, in spite of the fact that Millennials are less likely to get married and have children than members of previous generations. Other people attribute this to generational differences in work ethic. Some people believe that Millennials have overly high expectations for their workplace environments.

In reality, Millennials have often been unable to start career paths of any kind. The entry-level job of old has been replaced by the unpaid internship. Millennials crushed under student loan debt have been forced to work for free. Unpaid internships have frequently not led to real jobs, and they have sometimes made Millennials less employable down the line. The Great Recession is over, but it was largely older workers that benefited from the subsequent improvements to the economy. The research has also failed to produce evidence that Millennials are different from anyone else in terms of work ethic.

Meeting the Expectations of Millennial Employees

If anything, the employers who are able to provide Millennials with benefits and consistent and adequate salaries will usually get workers who are extremely motivated. Millennials do not take any of this for granted, since they typically started their working lives without benefits of any kind or even modest salaries. Employers often don’t have to go out of their way to accommodate Millennial employees. They just have to make sure that Millennials get what previous generations took for granted.

In addition to coping with record-breaking levels of student loan debt, Millennials are dealing with higher living costs than previous generations. A salary that might have stretched far when the Baby Boomers or Generation X members were in their twenties and thirties might be insufficient in a world where even the cost of food is higher. Underemployment is a crisis for the Millennial generation, and employers who go against this trend will get eager Millennial candidates right away.

Generational Conflict and Sensitivity

Millennials are very aware of how they are perceived by some members of the Baby Boom and Generation X cohorts. Some employees from these cohorts are happy to share these views publicly in workplaces. Employers need to recognize that this is a source of workplace conflict. In some workplaces, sensitivity training regarding ageism might be necessary. Getting an office environment set up for Millennial workers in a world where they are the majority partly means understanding the realities of this generation’s struggles. It also means finding ways to avoiding escalating the generational conflicts that have been going on for years.

If you are looking for an office to accommodate all generations including Millennials in the Workplace, Contact us. We can Help!

Top 3 Tips For Organizing Your Office Space

tips to organizing your office spaceWhile OfficeFinder is all about helping businesses find the best office space for their business, in the business world, there are many other things which are important to manage. Whether it’s monitoring the workplace for any thefts, or making sure you’ve filed taxes on time, it’s important that you keep the business thoroughly managed and organized. However, there’s more to being organized in the workplace than making sure all taxes are paid, or even that your employees are staying on task. Just how organized is your office space? After all, organizing your office space will lead to you to getting work done more efficiently. Ensuring your employees are organized, will help improve their productivity and let them feel more engaged in their work.

3 useful tips to consider for organizing your office space

#1. Color Code Your Folders

One of the most important tips for organizing your office space, is to color code your folders. The main problem that people have when it comes to staying organized, is that they have trouble locating their important files. However, by using color coded folders, as well as labeling them, it becomes a lot easier to know where everything is. For example, to signify the importance of tax documents, you could put all files in a red folder. As for the papers which aren’t really all that important, you could put them in a green folders and mark it as miscellaneous.

#2. Throw Away Old Papers

Your office might be pretty clean at first, but over the years, papers begin to build up, and it often becomes harder to differentiate between what’s useful and what is not. It’s also important to remember that just because you have documents that are important now, doesn’t mean that they’re always going to have some significance. Every now and then, clean out your folders and draws, checking to see what papers are still valuable, and which ones can be discarded.

#3. Create Your Own Personal Workspace

There’s more to having a great office space than simply making sure everything is organized. In fact, why not tidy it up a bit, and even buy some accessories so that your office could look nice? For example, you could purchase some lights and decorations for your office, or even more so, why not consider purchasing a personal mat for your space? If nothing else, it would also allow your customers and employees to know that it’s a place where anyone can feel welcome if they have a question.

These are our top 3 tips. For more on organizing your office space, Lifehack.com has more comprehensive recommendations at 21 Tips to Organize Your Office and Get More Done.

For more information about finding the perfect office space, feel free to contact us today at OfficeFinder. We look forward to hearing from you, and assisting you in the best way possible and all at no cost to you.

Does Remote Working Satisfy Employees or Alienate Them?

Remote workingThere has been a lot of debate over the years related to remote working by employees. Much of it has been centered around productivity form the business’ point of view. A recent survey by Coldwell Banker Commercial Affiliates on remote working comes at it from the employee point of view. It shows some interesting concerns. While remote working does offer increased flexibility to employees, less commute time and more control, the survey found that 45% of U.S. workers  and 55% of Millennials would rather work in an office than remotely. The survey found that there are 3 main factors employees are looking for:

  1. Face Time with Colleagues – A quarter of respondents report negative feelings while working from home, including feeling less a part of their team. It is more difficult to collaborate or develop relationships with fellow workers without a central office.
  2. Privacy – 70% of U.S. Adults – and a whopping three-quarters of Millennials – would feel more comfortable working in an open floor plan if there were private spaces available to them. This is one of the fundamental design factors in today’s coworking office design.
  3. Convenience – Most U.S. workers – and nearly two-thirds of Millennials (62%) – would prefer to work in an office that was in or near a shopping center over one that wasn’t. Which is one of the drivers of the return to the downtown markets from the suburbs especially for companies that have a high percentage of millennial workers. In other words, the tech giants.

This does not necessarily mean that businesses should end remote working, but it does evidence the need to have more flexibility. It does not need to be an all or nothing decision. Essentially employees like a base station to be able to use on an as needed bases. Done right this will enable those who are more comfortable working in an office to do so, but still allow the flexibility to work wherever they feel they can be most productive. It sounds like an agile workplace because it is. It also sounds like a Coworking office space and is that too.

If you would like some help in finding office space, that is what we do with our network of local brokers throughout the US, Canada and many other countries. Contact us today to find out how we can help; typically at no cost to you.

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6 Ways Providers Tweak Coworking Office Space

Coworking office spacecoworking office space has been on the rise in recent years. Why? Because they are extremely effective in promoting greater work efficiency, company morale and networking opportunities. If you are looking for ways to improve employee satisfaction and work performance even more, check out these six ways coworking office space providers tweak their spaces.

  1. Athletic Elements: Cities like NYC, Chicago, and LA have introduced coworking office space where people can rent an office space or chair…in a rock-climbing gym. This allows self-employed professionals to get a couple hours of work in, get in a climbing session, return to their laptop, and repeat. If you want to stimulate mental performance, provide your employees with the opportunity to get in some physical exercise. Even if the space provider does not provide it directly, very often you can find a gym or yoga studio nearby.
  2. Working Outdoors: Quite a few coworking office space providers have outdoor spaces, like a terrace or patio, you can use to work. Fresh air and sunshine is an excellent (and free) way to boost work performance and making your employees happier.
  3. Decor: Look for bright, vibrant colors and modern furniture. Usually cubicles are replaced with long tables, coffee tables, and comfy, yet supportive chairs. It will encourage an inclusive environment that promotes brainstorming and idea sharing. You will find colors that stimulate creativity and put employees in a better mood.
  4. Brain Food: A wellness atmosphere is always a great idea. Many spaces offer fruits, teas, and other healthy treats. You could even foot the bill. This is not only a way to gift your employees in little ways, but enhance the way they work and boost their energy levels.
  5. Free Beer and Party: Some coworking office space providers even provide complimentary beer and weekly networking parties with catered food. It is not only a great way to get free beer and good food, but also an opportunity to get to know your neighbors.
  6. Fun and Games: It is what younger employees want. A way to burn off steam during the day or after hours with a quick video game on a HD Monitor, ping pong, or pool. There are usually a wide variety of ways coworking office space providers can help entertain your employees.

Looking for a coworking space? We have lots of options from both large and small space providers. Contact us today to find out more!

Want to see a great example of a Coworking Office Space in Seattle. Below is the WeWork space in the historic Holyoke Building. WeWork does not usually take down a single floor of 15,000 to 20,000 square feet, but more in the neighborhood of 30,000 to 60,000 square feet at a time. They lease all 6 floors of the office space in the Holyoke Building at 1st and Spring Streets in Seattle. Have a look and you will see why their coworking office space is so popular. Don’t miss the basement lounge with he fun and games.


Click Here to view in full screen (recommended)

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The Importance of Flexible Workplaces

Flexible workplacesFlexible workplaces planning are important to the success of a business. Employees devote an average of 9 hours a day to their jobs and some many more than that. Why? To enhance their standard of living and fulfill their goals for life (www.bls.gov/tus/charts). Employers want an office environment to maximize employee engagement, productivity and morale. Employers need to be aware that their employees want an office that enriches the responsibilities demanded by their work; A place that is comfortable to work and where they can be productive. Retaining staff is important to maintain a healthy corporate environment. After all, high employee turnover is expensive and a morale reducer. The workplace has seen significant change over the past few years with the entry of Millennials and Generation Z into the workforce in addition to the Baby Boomers still in place. Keeping the multi-generational workplace productive requires a flexible officing strategy that has the flexibility to meet the needs of all.

Employee Engagement

Employers want employees to be engaged in their work and other employees. The workplace can produce relationships just as vital as a person’s natural family. Engagement is a key to establishing self-worth for employees. Contemporary offices are strategically arranged to promote interaction and to be a pleasant place to spend each day. It also will make it easy for employees to communicate with each other both for business and socially.

Increased Efficiency

Studies over time have shown that employees only spend about 40% of their time at their desk. Understanding this creates a need to develop an environment with a multiplicity of uses to combine privacy spaces with community spaces. Making the most of office space helps with work efficiency and deliberate use of company resources.

Affordability

The design of the work environment is usually dictated by the budget. When designing the workplace with a variety of uses, a business maximizes their return on investment. This includes limiting unnecessary energy cost and producing practices that reduce the ecological footprint of this generation. The open office has made a significant dent in the cost of tenant improvements. Fewer walls and fewer offices lead to improved affordability to provide other types of work spaces such as meeting areas and social areas.

Flexible workplace design is not complicated. With the help of a professional space planner and utilizing contemporary technologies purposed for building, will lead to an effective work environment. Contact us today to find office space that you can design a new innovative workspace your employees will appreciate for years to come.

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